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spaceplasma:

Jupiter’s Irregular Satellites

The planet Jupiter has 67 confirmed moons. This gives it the largest retinue of moons with “reasonably secure” orbits of any planet in the Solar System. In fact, Jupiter and its moons are like a miniature solar system with the inner moons orbiting faster than the others. Eight of Jupiter’s moons are regular satellites, with prograde and nearly circular orbits that are not greatly inclined with respect to Jupiter’s equatorial plane. The remainder of Jupiter’s moons are irregular satellites, whose prograde and retrograde orbits are much farther from Jupiter and have high inclinations and eccentricities. These moons were probably captured by Jupiter from solar orbits. There are 17 recently discovered irregular satellites that have not yet been named.

Image Credit: NASA/ESA/Lowell Observatory/J. Spencer/JHU-APL

spaceplasma:

Jupiter’s Irregular Satellites

The planet Jupiter has 67 confirmed moons. This gives it the largest retinue of moons with “reasonably secure” orbits of any planet in the Solar System. In fact, Jupiter and its moons are like a miniature solar system with the inner moons orbiting faster than the others. Eight of Jupiter’s moons are regular satellites, with prograde and nearly circular orbits that are not greatly inclined with respect to Jupiter’s equatorial plane. The remainder of Jupiter’s moons are irregular satellites, whose prograde and retrograde orbits are much farther from Jupiter and have high inclinations and eccentricities. These moons were probably captured by Jupiter from solar orbits. There are 17 recently discovered irregular satellites that have not yet been named.

Image Credit: NASA/ESA/Lowell Observatory/J. Spencer/JHU-APL

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rikki-titti-tavi:

sizvideos:

Rescuing a terrified abandoned dog - Video - Follow us

My eyes are leaking and I have a lump in my throat. This is so so cute

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I LOVE SHARKS!!!!!!!!

twinklybat

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lemony30:

justastrumpet:

Reading nooks make me blissfully happy

i don’t think yo all understand the intensity that comes with how much i have always wanted this 

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zerostatereflex:

Pendulum Wave DemonstrationPhysics is so relaxing to watch, :D

zerostatereflex:

Pendulum Wave Demonstration

Physics is so relaxing to watch, :D

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zacharielaughingalonewithsalad:

cellarspider:

twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck:

purrsianstuck:

During the Bubonic Plague, doctors wore these bird-like masks to avoid becoming sick. They would fill the beaks with spices and rose petals, so they wouldn’t have to smell the rotting bodies. 

A theory during the Bubonic Plague was that the plague was caused by evil spirits. To scare the spirits away, the masks were intentionally designed to be creepy. 

Mission fucking accomplished

Okay so I love this but it doesn’t cover the half of why the design is awesome and actually borders on making sense.

It wasn’t just that they didn’t want to smell the infected and dead, they thought it was crucial to protecting themselves. They had no way of knowing about what actually caused the plague, and so one of the other theories was that the smell of the infected all by itself was evil and could transmit the plague. So not only would they fill their masks with aromatic herbs and flowers, they would also burn fires in public areas, so that the smell of the smoke would “clear the air”. This all related to the miasma theory of contagion, which was one of the major theories out there until the 19th century. And it makes sense, in a way. Plague victims smelled awful, and there’s a general correlation between horrible septic smells and getting horribly sick if you’re around what causes them for too long.

You can see now that we’ve got two different theories as to what caused the plague that were worked into the design. That’s because the whole thing was an attempt by the doctors to cover as many bases as they could think of, and we’re still not done.

The glass eyepieces. They were either darkened or red, not something you generally want to have to contend with when examining patients. But the plague might be spread by eye contact via the evil eye, so best to ward that off too.

The illustration shows a doctor holding a stick. This was an examination tool, that helped the doctors keep some distance between themselves and the infected. They already had gloves on, but the extra level of separation was apparently deemed necessary. You could even take a pulse with it. Or keep people the fuck away from you, which was apparently a documented use.

Finally, the robe. It’s not just to look fancy, the cloth was waxed, as were all of the rest of their clothes. What’s one of the properties of wax? Water-based fluids aren’t absorbed by it. This was the closest you could get to a sterile, fully protecting garment back then. Because at least one person along the line was smart enough to think “Gee, I’d really rather not have the stuff coming out of those weeping sores anywhere on my person”.

So between all of these there’s a real sense that a lot of real thought was put into making sure the doctors were protected, even if they couldn’t exactly be sure from what. They worked with what information they had. And frankly, it’s a great design given what was available! You limit exposure to aspirated liquids, limit exposure to contaminated liquids already present, you limit contact with the infected. You also don’t give fleas any really good place to hop onto. That’s actually useful.

Beyond that, there were contracts the doctors would sign before they even got near a patient. They were to be under quarantine themselves, they wouldn’t treat patients without a custodian monitoring them and helping when something had to be physically contacted, and they would not treat non-plague patients for the duration. There was an actual system in place by the time the plague doctors really became a thing to make sure they didn’t infect anyone either.

These guys were the product of the scientific process at work, and the scientific process made a bitchin’ proto-hazmat suit. And containment protocols!

reblogging for the sweet history lesson

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rhetthammersmithhorror:

Attack of the Monsters aka Gamera vs. Guiron . ‘69

rhetthammersmithhorror:

Attack of the Monsters aka Gamera vs. Guiron . ‘69

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tinyhousedarling:

iniquitous-intentions:

warriorofwellness:

hellyeshaley:

These are all so beautiful and functional. 

ah yes, i see the bedroom fandom is growing.  

excellent.

tinyhousedarling

I really like these!  Thank you! 

(Source: dmnq8)

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tinyhousedarling:

Hidden Gem: Home’s Plain Exterior Hides a Fun Interior

In architecture as in the rest of life, what you see isn’t necessarily all that there is. The Case House in Sapporo, Hokkaido in Japan is a stunning example of this philosophy. The home, designed by Jun Igarishi Architects, is deceptively simple on the outside but bright and playful on the inside.  

The exterior of the home is clad in clean white panels punctuated with small square windows. Both the panels and the windows get successively smaller as they get closer to the ground. Wires run from the ground to the top of the house to the ground, inviting plants to wind around them as the years pass. Eventually, the home’s facade will be partially obscured by living greenery.

Inside, the home is filled with light, curves and multiple levels that draw the eye all around. Multiple steel spiral staircases connect the ground level to several loft spaces. By separating the home’s zones in this way rather than putting floors and walls between each area, the home’s interior feels comfortably and logically segmented.

Despite the logic, it manages to remain playful and exudes the kind of fun personality that just begs to be explored. The areas which are closed in tend to be short hallways, featuring either exciting curves or a glimpse of whatever awaits the traveler at the end.

One of the most drop-dead beautiful pieces in the home is the floor-to-ceiling bookcase in the living area which terminates at the bottom of one of the loft areas. The bookcase provides ample storage in a minimal amount of floor space, leaving the living area free for the residents’ children to play and explore this wonderland-like abode.